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  • #16
    Sorry, Chanelle, I have to disagree with you there. There's a major influx of international graduates and immigrants from Europe and Asia and almost every one of them has an engineering or science degree - a dime a dozen. Just because you end up with a four year degree doesn't mean it'll get you anywhere and all these aforementioned degrees require additional post-graduate courses. I'll give you an example: Where I am in the pacific northwest (British Columbia,Canada), our province is the gateway to Asia and science degrees alone mean very little. They're as common as highschool diplomas. Most graduates move on to take post-graduate studies. Business degrees are useful as a stepping stone but are also useless without an MBA and plenty of work experience or more post-graduate studies like the CPA or CFA route even after an accounting degree. Keep in mind many professional designations require 1-2 years of additional post-graduate courses (ie CPA), exams and/or a licensing exam while being employed in accounting, credit management, hr management. Don't be misguided. There is far more post-grad than you realize. More so than before, students are also combining designations and degrees. I was able to combine an MBA and CPA 15 years ago and that was a novelty - not so now. My brother combined a regular business degree (BBA) with a double bioengineering degree (BSc) for his undergrad and is now doing his PhD in pharmaceutical sciences. His aim is to work with/run hospitals.

    Milena, I don't think it's wise to start doing any courses until you have your path straightened out because it sounds like you need to learn more about your path and just how much you're willing to invest in your future. Do more research. If you think you'll achieve anything with a four year degree, good luck. It isn't how the world works anymore.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Rose Mosse View Post
      Milena, I don't think it's wise to start doing any courses until you have your path straightened out because it sounds like you need to learn more about your path and just how much you're willing to invest in your future. Do more research.
      I think I agree. I think first you should try and find a profession that you would like to do and that suits your interests, and then research the best way to get there. At the moment it sounds like you just want to pick some courses which might end up throwing you into a well paid job, without a specific profession in mind for the end. If you know there's an interesting job which you'll enjoy at the end, it will help keep you motivated when you're up to your eyes in coursework.

      However, I also understand that it's very hard to decide exactly what you want to go into. Most people just tend to fall into their jobs by accident or though people that they know.

      If you want the top careers though, I think you need to be more focused in exactly what you are aiming for.
      Just because someone's by your side, it doesn't mean they're on your side.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Rose Mosse View Post
        Sorry, Chanelle, I have to disagree with you there. There's a major influx of international graduates and immigrants from Europe and Asia and almost every one of them has an engineering or science degree - a dime a dozen. Just because you end up with a four year degree doesn't mean it'll get you anywhere and all these aforementioned degrees require additional post-graduate courses. I'll give you an example: Where I am in the pacific northwest (British Columbia,Canada), our province is the gateway to Asia and science degrees alone mean very little. They're as common as highschool diplomas. Most graduates move on to take post-graduate studies. Business degrees are useful as a stepping stone but are also useless without an MBA and plenty of work experience or more post-graduate studies like the CPA or CFA route even after an accounting degree. Keep in mind many professional designations require 1-2 years of additional post-graduate courses (ie CPA), exams and/or a licensing exam while being employed in accounting, credit management, hr management. Don't be misguided. There is far more post-grad than you realize. More so than before, students are also combining designations and degrees. I was able to combine an MBA and CPA 15 years ago and that was a novelty - not so now. My brother combined a regular business degree (BBA) with a double bioengineering degree (BSc) for his undergrad and is now doing his PhD in pharmaceutical sciences. His aim is to work with/run hospitals.

        Milena, I don't think it's wise to start doing any courses until you have your path straightened out because it sounds like you need to learn more about your path and just how much you're willing to invest in your future. Do more research. If you think you'll achieve anything with a four year degree, good luck. It isn't how the world works anymore.
        Perhaps that is the way it is where you are from but from industries I've been in, engineering degrees are still HOT and pay well enough to afford a good standard of living without having to split the rent cost with a roommate. There are high paying jobs with just a BS degree and if you couple that with experience, you can work your way up the ladder. I've already mentioned previously that the highest paying jobs have 2 and 2 meaning an engineering degree plus an MBA to clinch job security and a high ranking position within the company or corporate level which is a given. I've reiterated that already. You're also competing with a lot of senior men in particular who don't have graduate degrees and have been up at the top for a long time and not leaving anytime soon. That prevents ascension, unfortunately. The old guard is still in control power wise at the corporate level. I'm not misguided in the least. I know due to my husband, my own career, siblings and in-laws. We are all very much in-the-know. I know some super brainiacs in think tanks and many of them waltzed in with BS, some with grad degrees and they were so unusually intelligent that they rose up the senior statuses quickly. I'm sure they were an anomaly but it is possible if you shine and set yourself apart from the crowd or pack.

        Milena, keep in mind that once you get your foot in the door with a 4-year degree, some companies actually pay for your graduate degree or reimburse the cost of tuition. Look into that. The main thing is to get in and after that you swim or navigate yourself. Advanced education is important but so is real world experience, too. And, connections; real in-person connections help you go places. I know what I'm talking about because so many people in my family went far in life. It's not always what you know; it's who you know that gets you there. Remember that.
        "If you bungle raising your children, whatever else you do well in life doesn't matter very much."

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        • #19
          Subsidized tuition usually comes with a cost. Most companies that agree to that require you to sign a contract indicating your tenure for a minimum x amount of years (usually 2-3) following completion of the certification or other PD. Keep that in mind if you're required to move due to family commitments etc later on down the line but it's a good point by Chanelle. You might want to bring that up in a job interview perhaps if appropriate. I took a pay cut in my current industry but it offers a ridiculous amount of flexibility. The salary is not too shabby but I could be making a lot more. For me, I've noticed money was a tad more important when I was younger and flexibility has become invaluable as I've gotten older.
          Last edited by Rose Mosse; February 28th, 2018, 09:37 PM.

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          • #20
            Thank you all for replying.

            Ihave to declare this year so I decided to go with engineering and if I do well transfer to a 4 year as a junior. I'm going to focus on chemical at that point. Ive applied to take a walk through a chemical plant in my area. I've done chem 1 and 2 with labs and I like being in a lab and did okay A and B. But I agree in order to be competitive a PhD (I couldnt afford a masters) would have to be done. I will just focus on getting into a 4 year for now as the thought of going that far is daunting and maybe too long a process. I dont have connections so I would need to make some though im not sure how maybe going to office hours with professors? For now I'm only working a couple nights a week in retail so I stay on top of my school work. Doing any part time job more than that like at a firm or plant would be too much for me.

            rose, when you say flexibility do you mean ability to take time off or make your own schedule? How does this help your lifestyle?

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            • #21
              I can't speak for engineers but CPAs have local chapters, same as CHRPs (human resources professionals). I don't know if there's a chapter or some kind of coalition of chemical engineers in your locale. Your biggest network right now is your uni, your professors, your academic advisor. If you're just finishing your first year now, this is the time to apply and look at internships. They often require applications one year in advance. Your faculty should also have a job board posted somewhere. Talk to your academic advisor or faculty advisor. There is usually one or two appointed per department. By flexibility I mean work hours, vacation time and working from home. Those things became more important to me over time. I work with a corporate structure that leaves room for that. You really have to love what you do.

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              • #22
                My husband and I did an internship where we were paid while we were enrolled in undergrad and grad school AND the company reimbursed our tuition. It was tough. We made priceless connections at the corporate level and were promoted from within. That's how we navigated. We had lean years in the beginning but we played our cards smart and the cherry on top of this sundae as we fast forward later is that we'll own our home free and clear within 2 years from today.
                "If you bungle raising your children, whatever else you do well in life doesn't matter very much."

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                • #23
                  I have been researching other high paying fields and actuary came up. I got an A in stats a few years ago and I see that the pay seems to keep going up with the more experience you have where engineers are sort of capped after a few years unless they go into management or consultation. Also, I would prefer working with data instead of machines or chemicals. Any thoughts or experiences are appreciated.

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                  • #24
                    That seems more positive. Focus on not only what you're good at but also what you enjoy doing. Look into auditing(sitting in, no registration, no marks) an actuarial science class for one semester.

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                    • #25
                      Does nursing need a lot of math? I thought it requires memorization?

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                      • #26
                        Pole Dancing 101.
                        "First off, welcome to the Relationship Forums, You'll come to understand that I don't pull any punches when giving my opinion/advice and I hope you're not so sensitive to what I see as the truth of the matter." Me!

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by yupson View Post
                          Does nursing need a lot of math? I thought it requires memorization?
                          As far as I know it doesn't. And it's very memorization heavy. I don't have the caretaker personality it calls for personally. And I don't think strippers make much after 30. Early retirement? Lol.

                          I'm not going to do actuary. I decided making insurance companies money at the end of life would not be fulfilling. I would have 3 years after this year before I get a B.S. in eng. If I do good after next semester. I am anxious as these decisions are going to affect the rest of my life.

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                          • #28
                            What's the eng program like at your school? I lived with engineering friends in undergrad and the program is all-consuming. As far as I can remember everyone I knew in engineering was married to the program and very committed. It was a very tight and close knit community/group of students and the workload was considerable. If there was an engineering anthem they'd be singing it every morning and they were very proud and extremely determined engineering students - not snobby, but proud and very committed to the intense program. You don't seem like that for some reason. You've got a wandering eye for other programs that make more money. Do you feel that any financial hardship at home or elsewhere may be contributing to this anxiety (which seems founded on salary/money)?
                            Last edited by Rose Mosse; March 13th, 2018, 07:24 AM.

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                            • #29
                              Rose Mosse, the truth is that I really wanted to be a doctor but I don't have the grades or a good chance of getting in. My first degree had a very low gpa but that was due to family and personal problems. So, I'm in therapy now (have been for a year) and I'm paying out of pocket for college. I'm choosing a major which can make a 6 figure income because I want a stable future and to be successful. I would like to afford a nice house and invest in the economy. My parents were/are poor and I just don't want to live like they did. I've pretty much made up my mind and am starting the engineering AS program officially this summer and should graduate by Spring 19. If that goes well I'm going to apply to a 4 year college to finish an engineering BS by Spring 21. I hope with that and some internships along the way I can land at least an 80k job. In short if it seems like I'm not overly excited it's because it isn't my first choice for a career but I think it's an okay one.
                              Last edited by Milena; March 13th, 2018, 06:19 PM.

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                              • #30
                                Okay, that's understandable. You have experience and your earlier experiences will fuel you compared to new students who are younger and may not have as much motivation or become distracted. You are already in the program and about to begin it and I think while you believe in your dream, you're getting distracted and jittery. Don't do that..stay focused. Remember why you signed up and there obviously was a reason why you picked engineering over other areas.

                                Leave a couple of years of room for growth (re the 80K) and internships are a very good idea. Be realistic with the starting salary and focus more on experience. I think internships are mandatory for programs like eng and fairly early on you're going to have to choose the type of engineer you want to be and design your courses appropriately. I can't tell you what the future holds for you except that if you are passionate about what you do, it'll take you places. Don't cripple yourself and put the horse before the cart, so to speak. I don't believe 6 figures is beyond your reach especially if you rise to management or a more senior position. You aren't going to get there without passion though so start kindling that fire inside you and keep feeding it in healthy ways. Internships are a good example but you don't have to wait for an internship through your school. You can also be proactive and start looking at top firms or industries that you're interested in learning more about. Find out all about the top companies you wish to work for, look at their numbers if they're public companies, check out the corporate culture, see how far you can rise inside those corporations and who sits at what position currently and find out more about some of the leading figures in the industry. Of course all of this depends on how much you want to be an engineer. You weren't admitted for nothing. You certainly are good for prerequisites and that's not nothing. Don't take that forgranted. Focus on those healthy ways to keep fueling that motivation. I wouldn't encourage detouring from the engineering route at this point. From what I see it's nerves and a bit of anxiety (which is normal) before starting an intense program and one that you've waited for. Give it a chance and see where it takes you in the first year.

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